The Inimitable Tiff


  1. When beholding a majestic 13,000-year-old Eucalyptus tree, how can human arrogance dare deny its reality under the blindness of dogma?
    At a time when 40% of the American public don’t believe Earth is more than 6,000 years old, Rachel Sussman’s magnificent photographs of the oldest living things in the world stand not only as a masterpiece of art but also a masterpiece of science communication.  (via explore-blog)

    (via naomijade)

  2. futurejournalismproject:

Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top
Via BBC.

    futurejournalismproject:

    Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Showing Who’s Boss While Hunting With Eagle on Mongolian Mountain Top

    Via BBC.

  3. TurboTax Maker Linked to ‘Grassroots’ Campaign Against Free, Simple Tax Filing - ProPublica

    Intuit and its allies are continuing to work against proposals for what’s known as return-free filing.

  4. livelymorgue:

    May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

  5. footnoted* — Hertz CFO being paid twice for one job

    Under his agreement with Hertz, Kennedy’s base salary is $660K a year, or $35K a year more than he was making at Hilton. But once you factor in the fact that Hilton will continue to pay him $1.06m for the next three years — unless he suddenly decides to work for another hotel company — and his annual base grows substantially.

    Over the years, we’ve certainly seen other examples of people getting paid not to work. But a three-year agreement is longer than most others we’ve seen. And once you factor in that Kennedy was actually only out of work for a little over four months, it doesn’t seem like a great deal for Hilton’s investors, who haven’t exactly been rewarded by the company going public.

  6. What will yesterday’s news look like tomorrow? — Adrienne LaFrance

    To understand how the news industry has transformed in the past decade and a half, it helps to consider our evolving perceptions of the relationship between news and time.

    Think of it this way: When’s the last time you saw an A1 above-the-fold headline in print that actually revealed something you hadn’t already heard or seen online? Contemplate the eternity that passes in the 20 minutes between email news alerts from competing media outlets. Even the term “24-hour news cycle” feels obsolete.

  7. futurejournalismproject:

Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen
From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar. 
Via Charles Apple.

    futurejournalismproject:

    Kitchen Maker Takes Over Classified Ads, Makes a Kitchen

    From a newspaper in Colombia. The designer’s Felipe Salazar

    Via Charles Apple.

  8. The attribution of violent crime to people diagnosed with mental illness is increasing stigmatization of the mentally ill while virtually no effort is being made to address the much broader cultural problem of anger management. This broader problem encompasses not just mass murders but violence toward children and spouses, rape, road rage, assault, and violent robberies. We are a culture awash in anger.
  9. livelymorgue:

    Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

  10. The question to ask about this is what should we conclude from the fact that male-dominated occupations tend to be higher paying than woman-dominated ones? Are women simply en masse failing to notice the wage structure of the American labor market and “choosing” in droves to not make money? Or are they being pushed out of more remunerative fields by discrimination? Are they being discouraged from even considering these careers? And how is it that the male-dominated fields came to have structurally higher pay scales in the first place?

    It’s true that these problems aren’t amenable to super-simple legislative fixes. But that doesn’t mean they’re not real problems.