The Inimitable Tiff


  1. She has a great attraction for simple people who are puzzled by organized society, who object to paying taxes, who dislike the “welfare” state, who feel guilt at the thought of the suffering of others but who would like to harden their hearts. For them, she has an enticing prescription: altruism is the root of all evil, self-interest is the only good, and if you’re dumb or incompetent that’s your lookout.
  2. Lawsplainer: How Mike Brown's Alleged Robbery Of A Liquor Store Matters, And How It Doesn't | Popehat

    Worth a quick read.

  3. Humans need not apply

    jkottke:

    This video combines two thoughts to reach an alarming conclusion: “Technology gets better, cheaper, and faster at a rate biology can’t match” + “Economics always wins” = “Automation is inevitable.”

    That’s why it’s important to emphasize again this stuff isn’t science fiction. The robots…

  4. Today in Backups

    • Me:
      excel dumps works as a backup, to my mind.

    • Colleague:
      ok, so ill just have to take a dump regularly

    • (beat)

    • Me:
      Ha.

    • Colleague:
      oh my!


  5. wtfevolution:

"I miss dinosaurs."
"Evolution, we’ve talked about this."
"But I miss them.”
"You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”
"It’s not the same."
"I know. I’m sorry."
"Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"
"Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."
"Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"
"Yeah, that sounds better."
"And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"
"I don’t see why not."
"And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”
"Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."
"I think it would. Thanks for understanding."
"You got it, evolution. Anytime."
Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

    wtfevolution:

    "I miss dinosaurs."

    "Evolution, we’ve talked about this."

    "But I miss them.”

    "You turned them into birds, remember? It was the best you could do, given the circumstances.”

    "It’s not the same."

    "I know. I’m sorry."

    "Can I at least make these cassowaries 50 feet tall?"

    "Come on, you know that size didn’t work out so well before."

    "Six feet, then? And over 100 pounds?"

    "Yeah, that sounds better."

    "And can I put weird prehistoric crests on their heads?"

    "I don’t see why not."

    "And can they slash people’s throats with their dagger claws?”

    "Sure, pal, if that would make you feel better."

    "I think it would. Thanks for understanding."

    "You got it, evolution. Anytime."

    Source: Wikimedia Commons / Bjørn Christian Tørrissen

  6. utnereader:

Class War Continues
Can a maximum wage help bridge the income inequality gap?

    utnereader:

    Class War Continues

    Can a maximum wage help bridge the income inequality gap?

  7. Boeing’s Figuring Out How to Make Jet Fuel From Tobacco

    singularitarian:

    You can’t use tobacco while flying, but your plane can. Boeing is working with South African Airways to power the carrier’s planes with biofuel derived from a new breed of tobacco plant.

  8. First Night in Kyiv | Balkanist

    Anonymous female journalist:

    The fact I’m writing this is a failure – not a failure of my ability to be professional, as the sushi-chewing Very Respected Editor implied, nor a failure to ‘be a good girl’, as the Very Respected Journalist who did things to my body against my consent commanded – but a failure to let women get on with their work, the work they want to do, without having to go through the exhausting eternal distraction of dealing with and recovering from sexism – including sexual aggression. The failure is all the unwritten articles and unwritten books of women who have had to instead spend their time recovering from these experiences, or – and who could blame them – decide to stop venturing into this world.

    As highlighted in a also-good post by Martin Belam.

  9. One of the greatest privileges of being on one’s own is the flattering illusion that one is, in truth, really quite an easy person to live with.

    With such a poor level of understanding of our [own] characters, no wonder we aren’t in any position to know who we should be looking out for.

  10. futurejournalismproject:

Can You Design a Universal Font?
A few months ago Wikipedia unveiled a typographical “refresh” across its Web properties. As Fast Company pointed out at the time, doing so across 33 million pages and 297 languages isn’t easy:

“The changes might seem subtle—some readers of Wikipedia might not even know there’s a change!” says Wikimedia’s Director of User Experience Jared Zimmerman. “But for us, it starts to highlight some bigger issues.”
Those bigger issue stem from a daunting problem: Wikipedia is 100% open source and free for the world to use. But there is no free and open typeface that can render in all of the world’s languages. For those of us in the Western world, it’s not much of a problem. We’re privileged, using operating systems like OS X that license fonts for us. Plus, our Latin-based scripts are represented in the vast majority of typefaces, while most written language is actually not Latin-based…
…Historically, this has created a design culture of the haves and the have nots, in which the look of Wikipedia was subject to the whims of whatever your software providers had already licensed. When rendering its pages in your browser, all Wikipedia would ask for was “sans-serif”—basically, give me anything you’ve got that’s sans-serif! As you might imagine, this has been a mess.

Enter Google and its development of the Noto font family. The freely available font ”aims to support all the world’s languages” and achieve “visual harmonization across languages.” 
No small task but to date the two-year-old project supports 600 written languages and 100,000 characters. In July, support for Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean was added.
NPR has a good article on the background and continued development of Noto. In particular, it takes a look at whether a company like Google should be doing this at all:

[C]ritics like Pakistani-American writer Ali Eteraz are suspicious about grand plans by any of these big companies.
"I tend to go back and forth," Eteraz says. "Is it sort of a benign — possibly even helpful — universalism that Google is bringing to the table? Or is it something like technological imperialism?"
What he means is that when one group of people (in this case, Google) decides what to code for and what not to — and in what way — people who are not a part of that decision-making process, those who actually use these fonts and these languages, can feel ill-served.

"Language is the building block of people’s identities all around the world," Eteraz tells NPR, “and Google is basically saying that, ‘We got this.’”
In other words, with great power comes great responsibility.
Download the fonts here. Join the Noto Google Group here.
Image: Screenshot, Noto Sans Cherokee. 

    futurejournalismproject:

    Can You Design a Universal Font?

    A few months ago Wikipedia unveiled a typographical “refresh” across its Web properties. As Fast Company pointed out at the time, doing so across 33 million pages and 297 languages isn’t easy:

    “The changes might seem subtle—some readers of Wikipedia might not even know there’s a change!” says Wikimedia’s Director of User Experience Jared Zimmerman. “But for us, it starts to highlight some bigger issues.”

    Those bigger issue stem from a daunting problem: Wikipedia is 100% open source and free for the world to use. But there is no free and open typeface that can render in all of the world’s languages. For those of us in the Western world, it’s not much of a problem. We’re privileged, using operating systems like OS X that license fonts for us. Plus, our Latin-based scripts are represented in the vast majority of typefaces, while most written language is actually not Latin-based…

    …Historically, this has created a design culture of the haves and the have nots, in which the look of Wikipedia was subject to the whims of whatever your software providers had already licensed. When rendering its pages in your browser, all Wikipedia would ask for was “sans-serif”—basically, give me anything you’ve got that’s sans-serif! As you might imagine, this has been a mess.

    Enter Google and its development of the Noto font family. The freely available font ”aims to support all the world’s languages” and achieve “visual harmonization across languages.” 

    No small task but to date the two-year-old project supports 600 written languages and 100,000 characters. In July, support for Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean was added.

    NPR has a good article on the background and continued development of Noto. In particular, it takes a look at whether a company like Google should be doing this at all:

    [C]ritics like Pakistani-American writer Ali Eteraz are suspicious about grand plans by any of these big companies.

    "I tend to go back and forth," Eteraz says. "Is it sort of a benign — possibly even helpful — universalism that Google is bringing to the table? Or is it something like technological imperialism?"

    What he means is that when one group of people (in this case, Google) decides what to code for and what not to — and in what way — people who are not a part of that decision-making process, those who actually use these fonts and these languages, can feel ill-served.

    "Language is the building block of people’s identities all around the world," Eteraz tells NPR, “and Google is basically saying that, ‘We got this.’”

    In other words, with great power comes great responsibility.

    Download the fonts here. Join the Noto Google Group here.

    Image: Screenshot, Noto Sans Cherokee