The Inimitable Tiff

Aug 06

thisiscitylab:

City maps made by judgmental jerks.
[Map by RBD Enterprises]

thisiscitylab:

City maps made by judgmental jerks.

[Map by RBD Enterprises]

Story Behind the Story | Weed World: What I Saw at the Revolution from NYT Insider
"Lawrence Downes wrote the lead editorial on Colorado’s experiment in marijuana legalization. We asked about the trip he took to research the issue".
The most interesting bit:

Spending a week looking at Colorado through a marijuana lens had an odd effect. Somehow it made me lose my alcohol goggles, the ones that make you blind to the ubiquity of liquor in the culture at large. Ours is a booze-soaked country, there’s no denying.
…
The song [“Okie From Muskogee”] long ago lost its counter-counter-cultural punch, but whether Mr. Haggard was being all satiric or truly in earnest, I have never heard any hidden meaning or irony in his matter-of-fact refrain about what Okies consider “the biggest thrill of all” — getting drunk on grain alcohol.
Inside the lovely Art Deco Paramount theater, where the seats have cup holders, audience members [at a Haggard concert] raised high their Pabst Blue Ribbon tall boys and sang along. The song was a perfect summation of incoherence of the American drug war, with its prim rejection of one relatively benign herbal drug, and affection bordering on reverence for a wretchedly damaging liquid one.
It was an accidental anthem for legalization, and we knew all the words by heart.

Story Behind the Story | Weed World: What I Saw at the Revolution from NYT Insider

"Lawrence Downes wrote the lead editorial on Colorado’s experiment in marijuana legalization. We asked about the trip he took to research the issue".

The most interesting bit:

Spending a week looking at Colorado through a marijuana lens had an odd effect. Somehow it made me lose my alcohol goggles, the ones that make you blind to the ubiquity of liquor in the culture at large. Ours is a booze-soaked country, there’s no denying.

The song [“Okie From Muskogee”] long ago lost its counter-counter-cultural punch, but whether Mr. Haggard was being all satiric or truly in earnest, I have never heard any hidden meaning or irony in his matter-of-fact refrain about what Okies consider “the biggest thrill of all” — getting drunk on grain alcohol.

Inside the lovely Art Deco Paramount theater, where the seats have cup holders, audience members [at a Haggard concert] raised high their Pabst Blue Ribbon tall boys and sang along. The song was a perfect summation of incoherence of the American drug war, with its prim rejection of one relatively benign herbal drug, and affection bordering on reverence for a wretchedly damaging liquid one.

It was an accidental anthem for legalization, and we knew all the words by heart.

Aug 04

PS General Slocum - Wikipedia
All of this is very sad.

The PS General Slocum was a passenger steamboat built in Brooklyn, New York, in 1891. The General Slocum was named for Civil War General and New YorkCongressmanHenry Warner Slocum. She operated in the New York City area as an excursion steamer for the next thirteen years under the same ownership. During her service history, she was involved in a number of mishaps, including multiple groundings and collisions.
On June 15, 1904, the General Slocum caught fire and sank in the East River of New York City.[1] At the time of the accident she was on a chartered run carrying members of St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church (German Americans fromLittle Germany, Manhattan) to a church picnic. An estimated 1,021 of the 1,342 people on board died. The General Slocum disaster was the New York area’s worst disaster in terms of loss of life until the September 11, 2001 attacks, and remains the worst maritime disaster in the city’s history.[2] The events surrounding the General Slocum fire have appeared in a number of books, plays and movies.

From This American Life, September 21, 2001, a segment about the disaster by the late David Rakoff.

PS General Slocum - Wikipedia

All of this is very sad.

The PS General Slocum was a passenger steamboat built in BrooklynNew York, in 1891. The General Slocum was named for Civil War General and New YorkCongressmanHenry Warner Slocum. She operated in the New York City area as an excursion steamer for the next thirteen years under the same ownership. During her service history, she was involved in a number of mishaps, including multiple groundings and collisions.

On June 15, 1904, the General Slocum caught fire and sank in the East River of New York City.[1] At the time of the accident she was on a chartered run carrying members of St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church (German Americans fromLittle Germany, Manhattan) to a church picnic. An estimated 1,021 of the 1,342 people on board died. The General Slocum disaster was the New York area’s worst disaster in terms of loss of life until the September 11, 2001 attacks, and remains the worst maritime disaster in the city’s history.[2] The events surrounding the General Slocum fire have appeared in a number of books, plays and movies.

From This American Life, September 21, 2001, a segment about the disaster by the late David Rakoff.

Aug 03

“I looked up how much Americans spend on pets annually and have concluded that you do not want to know. I could tell you what I spent on my own cat’s special kidney health cat food and kidney and thyroid medication, and periodic blood tests that cost $300 and always came back normal, but I never calculated my own annual spending, lest I be forced to confront some uncomfortable facts about me. What our mass spending on products to pamper animals who seem happiest while rolling in feces or eating the guts out of rodents — who don’t, in fact, seem significantly less happy if they lose half their limbs — tells us about ourselves as a nation is probably also something we don’t want to know. But it occurs to me that it may be symptomatic of the same chronic deprivation as are the billion-dollar industries in romance novels and porn.” — Tim Kreider — A Man And His Cat - NYT Opinionator

Aug 01

[video]

[video]

[David] Leonhardt: I don’t think anyone knows what the future of public-opinion research will look like, but it seems very likely to continue changing. Rigorous public-opinion research has a wonderful record in this country, and it has relied on the telephone for its success. To state the obvious, the way people are using their telephones has changed and isn’t done changing.” — The New York Times rocked the polling world over the weekend. Here’s why. - The Washington Post

Lots more in the post about methodologies and types of responses, of course. This isn’t the ‘rocked’ part, just something interesting to think about.

Jul 31

Recalling the Horror of the Flight 17 Crash Site - NYT Insider, Q&A with Sabrina Tavernise.


Q. Having had some time to reflect on the reporting experience, how do you feel?

A.  Looking back at it, I feel like it was an incredible privilege that I was the one who was able to witness this and was able to relay it, but it also feels like a burden. I can’t stop thinking about these people and what they looked like and what it must be like for everyone who knew someone on that plane. I can’t put my finger on how that field was different from other conflict reporting. Part of it was just the quiet and the darkness.


Photo credit: Dmitry Lovetsky/Associated Press
Photo caption: A mix of rebels, rescue workers and villagers wandered around the crash site.

Recalling the Horror of the Flight 17 Crash Site - NYT Insider, Q&A with Sabrina Tavernise.

Q. Having had some time to reflect on the reporting experience, how do you feel?

A. Looking back at it, I feel like it was an incredible privilege that I was the one who was able to witness this and was able to relay it, but it also feels like a burden. I can’t stop thinking about these people and what they looked like and what it must be like for everyone who knew someone on that plane. I can’t put my finger on how that field was different from other conflict reporting. Part of it was just the quiet and the darkness.

Photo credit: Dmitry Lovetsky/Associated Press

Photo caption: A mix of rebels, rescue workers and villagers wandered around the crash site.

scienceisbeauty:

Smith Chart visual representation of interaction between resistive and reactive components.
(Via Wikimedia Commons)

scienceisbeauty:

Smith Chart visual representation of interaction between resistive and reactive components.

(Via Wikimedia Commons)

Jul 30

“That’s the way this city lives now — one funeral to another, hiding from bombs and collecting the dead.” —

Sergey Ponomarev, freelance photographer covering Gaza, in an interview with the New York Times. Photographing on the Ground in Gaza.

Read through to see Sergey’s recent photos from Gaza.

(via futurejournalismproject)